Category Archives: Equality

Thoughts on the U.S. Election + the Rise of Fascism

When I woke up Wednesday morning and saw the results of the U.S. Election I felt lost for words. I couldn’t honestly say that I was surprised (not after Brexit), but I was shocked. I didn’t think that people would actually elect a sexist, racist, homophobic, narcissistic fascist like Trump. While I don’t think all …

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Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa

Your Heart Is a Muscle the Size of a Fist by Sunil Yapa* took me by surprise. It took me a while to get into it, and even longer to realize that it was based on the real events in Seattle around the WTO protests in 1999 (probably because I was 12 at the time and …

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International Women’s Day, Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month and the Struggle

On this years International Women’s Day, I encourage you to learn more about AI diseases, especially what signs and symptoms to watch out for, get to know your family’s medical history, and help educate other people on the seriousness and importance of recognizing, treating, studying and researching AI diseases.

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The Giddy Death of the Gays and the Strange Demise of the Straights by Redfern Jon Barrett

The Giddy Death of the Gays and the Strange Demise of the Straights by Redfern Jon Barret is a beautifully written novel detailing our obsession with gender essentialism, monogamy, romantic love and sexual attraction. But what happens when we question these things? If we didn’t divide people into two genders, admitted that it’s possible to love …

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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Content warning for cancer, racism, classism, medical procedures, death. If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably never heard about Henrietta Lacks, although you might have heard about HeLa cells. The first line of immortal cells, that have been used to research what causes cancer, and how can we suppress it, developing drugs for herpes, influenza, leukemia …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt

Angela’s Ashes: A Memoir by Frank McCourt became an almost instant bestseller when it was first published in 1996, and has won the Pulitzer Price, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Royal Society of Literature Award (amongst others). I think I watched the movie years ago, but I can’t remember much of it. Finally …

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Secular Sunday: Sexual Abuse & Victim Blaming in Religious Communities

TW for Sexual Abuse + Victim Blaming.   I am absolutely disgusted with the hiding of sexual abuse within religious organizations and institutions, and the victim blaming. I’ll be focusing on Evangelical Christianity in this post, because that is the cases that have come up for me lately, but that doesn’t mean it doesn’t happen in …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Lean In For Graduates by Sheryl Sandberg

Lean In for Graduates (the updated and expanded version of Lean In) by Sheryl Sandberg is a very thought-provoking read. While I might not agree with everything in it, it left me with a lot of things to think about. Lean In has been criticised for being very middle class-centric – and it is. Some women …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Yes Means Yes! by Jaclyn Friedman & Jessica Valenti

Yes Means Yes!: Visions of Female Sexual Power and A World Without Rape is a fantastic anthology edited by Jaclyn Friedman and Jessica Valenti. It is groundbreaking in dismantling our beliefs around rape, but instead putting in a framework of enthusiastic consent and respect for female sexual pleasure. Friedman and Valenti have found an incredible array …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Virgin by Hanne Blank

Virgin: The Untouched History by Hanne Blank is a fascinating look at how we see virginity, and how virginity has been viewed throughout history and in different cultures. Humans are the only species that care about virginity – although we are not the only species with a hymen. Even then, virginity cannot be defined and there …

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