Category Archives: History

Thoughts on the U.S. Election + the Rise of Fascism

When I woke up Wednesday morning and saw the results of the U.S. Election I felt lost for words. I couldn’t honestly say that I was surprised (not after Brexit), but I was shocked. I didn’t think that people would actually elect a sexist, racist, homophobic, narcissistic fascist like Trump. While I don’t think all …

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Hild by Nicola Griffith

Hild by Nicola Griffith is the imagined early life of St. Hilda of Whitby, one of the most powerful early converts to Christianity in England. It is clear that Griffith has done an astonishing amount of research, as she envelops you in a seventh century England that you can see, smell and almost touch and feel. …

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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot

Content warning for cancer, racism, classism, medical procedures, death. If you’re anything like me, you’ve probably never heard about Henrietta Lacks, although you might have heard about HeLa cells. The first line of immortal cells, that have been used to research what causes cancer, and how can we suppress it, developing drugs for herpes, influenza, leukemia …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Angela’s Ashes by Frank McCourt

Angela’s Ashes: A Memoir by Frank McCourt became an almost instant bestseller when it was first published in 1996, and has won the Pulitzer Price, the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Royal Society of Literature Award (amongst others). I think I watched the movie years ago, but I can’t remember much of it. Finally …

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Writer’s Wednesday: The Demon-Haunted World by Carl Sagan

The Demon-Haunted World: Science as a Candle in the Dark by Carl Sagan is an exemplary introduction to skeptical thinking through the use of science, while never forgetting how important wonder and awe is, when it comes to appreciating the magnitude of the universe we inhabit. While never crude or unfairly dismissive, Sagan convincingly makes the …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Virgin by Hanne Blank

Virgin: The Untouched History by Hanne Blank is a fascinating look at how we see virginity, and how virginity has been viewed throughout history and in different cultures. Humans are the only species that care about virginity – although we are not the only species with a hymen. Even then, virginity cannot be defined and there …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Brave New World by Aldous Huxley

Brave New World by Aldous Huxley is a classic for a reason, because even today, more than 80 years after it’s publication, it is still relevant. Everything still hits a little too close to home, and the future portrayed is not so unrealistic or far away. Huxley might have gotten certain details wrong, things he couldn’t …

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Writer’s Wednesday: Lipstick Jihad by Azadeh Moaveni

Lipstick Jihad: A Memoir of Growing up Iranian in America and American in Iran is the story of a young woman’s struggle for her identity and to find a place, where she belongs. Moaveni powerfully gives us a glimpse of what it is like, to grow up in one place thinking you belong somewhere else, but …

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Søren Kierkegaard 200 Years (+ Either/Or Book Review)

If Danish philosopher Søren Kierkegaard had still been alive, he would today, on the 5th of May 2013, have turned 200 years old. In honour of this anniversary I have decided to republish the following review from my old blog: I’ve been reading a book with excerpts from one of the most famous Danish philosophers …

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Easter Contradictions

Regular readers of my blog might recognize the following post from old blog, but thought it was worth sharing again this year. It’s Easter again, and therefore I’d like to enlighten you all with just a few contradictions in the Gospels concerning the events surrounding Easter. As a Christian I read the New Testament 4-5 …

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